expatriation

[ verb eks-pey-tree-eyt or, esp. British, -pa-tree-; adjective, noun eks-pey-tree-it, -eyt or, esp. British, -pa-tree- ]SEE DEFINITION OF expatriation

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EXPATRIATION

It declared any "scheme of expatriation" to be "delusive, cruel, and dangerous."

What benefit might he derive from Mark's expatriation—that is the question?

Will she herself consent to expatriation and the parting from her sister and yourself?

The right of expatriation was not at this time conceded by the British Government.

Nothing more was said to him as to the necessity of expatriation.

He was as good as a Viceroyship of India without the necessity of expatriation.

To these New Christians, as we have seen, expatriation was forbidden.

Like Harte, James has suffered from the charge of expatriation.

Nor did they leave it again, having no longer cause for expatriation.

They indignantly reject every overture for their expatriation.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EXPATRIATION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.