expatriate

[ verb eks-pey-tree-eyt or, esp. British, -pa-tree-; adjective, noun eks-pey-tree-it, -eyt or, esp. British, -pa-tree- ]SEE DEFINITION OF expatriate

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EXPATRIATE

To expatriate is purely oriental, quite unknown to the modern world.

But if you wish to make a race endure, rely upon it you should expatriate them.

One may expatriate or exile himself; he is banished by others.

We were advised to expatriate ourselves, to banish ourselves.

I have no patience with those people who expatriate themselves.

At all events, the easiest way to cut the knot is to expatriate.

Have you any idea what could have induced him to expatriate himself thus, at his age?

You can get up now and prepare to go with us and expatriate your sins.'

His recantation could not, however, recall the thousands of Dutch-African farmers whom he helped to expatriate.

German parents have no desire to expatriate every year a considerable number of their children.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EXPATRIATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.