empire

[ em-pahyuhr; for 8–10 also om-peer ]SEE DEFINITION OF empire
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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EMPIRE

I have sought thy daughter in marriage for Xerxes, prince of the empire.

What, then, must be the population of the British empire if the increase in one city was at that rate?

Still, the empire seems to take its course westward just the same.

He excludes "the insolence of office," and "the cutpurse of the empire and the rule."

And again she laughed, she who was so certain of her empire over this man's heart and body.

The depressing institutions of that British empire, colonel!'

I was already a republican and a freethinker in the days of the Empire.

We are told that the effort of the Greek, of Aristotle, was to "submit to the empire of fact."

The Romans never used coffins, and, under the empire, they burnt most of their dead.

I myself reign over the land, and am the first among the princes of the empire.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., from Old French empire "rule, authority, kingdom, imperial rule," from Latin imperium "rule, command," from imperare "to command," from im- "in" (see in- (2)) + parare "to order, prepare" (see pare).

Not etymologically restricted to "territory ruled by an emperor," but used that way. The Empire, meaning "the British Empire," first recorded 1772 (it officially devolved into "The Commonwealth" in 1931); before that it meant the Holy Roman Empire (1670s). Empire style (especially in reference to a style of dresses with high waistlines) is 1869, from the Second Empire "rule of Napoleon III of France" (1852-70). New York has been called the Empire State since 1834.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EMPIRE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.