Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EDGE

The edge of the garment was curiously wrought with golden palm leaves.

Along the edge of the green pines and spruce were lavender asters.

Looking around him, he at length, from the edge of the valley, descried Robert.

Now he scanned the trees on the edge of the clearing with painful anxiety.

And then they came to the edge of the cliff, where the heel marks ended.

By this time the English boats had reached the water's edge.

But is there no gate because we find none on the edge of the wood where it seemed to lie?

She went white and clutched the edge of the table, with her eyes closed.

He sat down on the edge of the balcony and stared out blankly.

Johnny was close on the edge of his long sleep by that time, and very comfortable.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English ecg "corner, edge, point," also "sword" (cf. ecgplega, literally "edge play," ecghete, literally "edge hate," both used poetically for "battle"), from Proto-Germanic *agjo (cf. Old Frisian egg "edge;" Old Saxon eggia "point, edge;" Middle Dutch egghe, Dutch eg; Old Norse egg, see egg (v.); Old High German ecka, German Eck "corner"), from PIE root *ak- "sharp, pointed" (cf. Sanskrit asrih "edge," Latin acies, Greek akis "point;" see acrid).

Spelling development of Old English -cg to Middle English -gg to Modern English -dge represents a widespread shift in pronunciation. To get the edge on (someone) is U.S. colloquial, first recorded 1911. Edge city is from Joel Garreau's 1992 book of that name. Razor's edge as a perilous narrow path translates Greek epi xyrou akmes. To have (one's) teeth on edge is from late 14c., though "It is not quite clear what is the precise notion originally expressed in this phrase" [OED].

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EDGE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.