dormancy

[ dawr-muh n-see ]SEE DEFINITION OF dormancy

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DORMANCY

That is a sign of the absence, or at least of the dormancy, of the Comic idea.

It has now to be shewn that the germs of disease also retain their vital powers in a state of dormancy during a lengthened period.

Thus, at the proper time, the milk-glands of a mammalian mother are awakened from their dormancy.

That has been during their season of dormancy, but in every case they have pushed at the proper time.

The change of seasons, and an annual period of dormancy, demand forethought and prudence.

The most remarkable thing about them is the length and intensity of their dormancy in hibernation.

During this confinement, they do not hibernate but rather enter a state of "dormancy" and become inactive.

The activity of the plague in London in 1563 made up for its dormancy in the years preceding.

A distinction of great importance from a physiological and a practical point of view is made between rest and dormancy in plants.

Five-lined skinks fast for at least half the year during the period of dormancy, from September to April.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DORMANCY

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