domestic

[ duh-mes-tik ]SEE DEFINITION OF domestic

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DOMESTIC

"He certainly was not what is called a domestic character," said Aunt Jane.

There is no longer a clear division between what is foreign and what is domestic.

They took an aspiring angel and made a domestic animal of him.

And after all, what happiness is there equal to domestic happiness?

In this view it is desirable to be introduced into the privacies of domestic life.

Domestic care, like every other, is liable to degenerate into excess.

She was an exposition of the domestic resources of Horn o' the Moon.

But not for that did aunt Ann relinquish her quest for the betterment of the domestic world.

I demand the service of this contrabandist as my domestic until this day week.'

Later on a greater refinement of domestic customs was introduced.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., from Middle French domestique (14c.) and directly from Latin domesticus "belonging to the household," from domus "house," from PIE *domo-/*domu- "house, household" (cf. Sanskrit damah "house;" Avestan demana- "house;" Greek domos "house," despotes "master, lord;" Latin dominus "master of a household;" Old Church Slavonic domu, Russian dom "house;" Lithuanian dimstis "enclosed court, property;" Old English timber "building, structure"), from *dem-/*dom- "build."

It represents the usual Indo-European word for "house" (Italian, Spanish casa are from Latin casa "cottage, hut;" Germanic *hus is of obscure origin). The noun meaning "household servant" is 1530s (a sense also found in Old French domestique). Domestics, originally "articles of home manufacture," is attested from 1620s. Related: Domestically. Domestic violence is attested from 19c. as "revolution and insurrection;" 1977 as "spouse abuse, violence in the home."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DOMESTIC

internecine

adjectiveinvolving conflict within a group
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