distress

[ dih-stres ]SEE DEFINITION OF distress

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DISTRESS

Milza endeavoured, in her own artless way, to soothe the distress her words had excited.

She put her arms about her neck, and affectionately inquired the cause of her distress.

The horses have not had any water for two days, and show signs of distress.

The government admitted the distress, but denied that it was increasing.

I was alone with God, and prayed to him for help in my distress, and for direction.

Her words rushed forth with a bitterness that was the cover of her distress.

A groan of distress burst from him, and he fled the place in ignominious rout.

Garson with difficulty suppressed the cry of distress that rose to his lips.

We should call upon God in every time of trouble, danger or distress.

Generosity to those in distress was at all times characteristic of him.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., "circumstance that causes anxiety or hardship," from Old French destresse, from Vulgar Latin *districtia "restraint, affliction, narrowness, distress," from Latin districtus, past participle of distringere "draw apart, hinder," also, in Medieval Latin "compel, coerce," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + stringere "draw tight, press together" (see strain (v.)). Meaning "anguish, suffering; grief" is from c.1300.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DISTRESS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.