derive

[ dih-rahyv ]SEE DEFINITION OF derive

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DERIVE

From these I shall endeavor to derive all the advantages which they may afford.

Stevie did not seem to derive any personal gratification from what he had done.

Let us derive instruction, as well as consolation, from this scene.

And from this, more than from anything else, do we derive our firm conviction of the success of our work.'

It would be a rather poor way to derive the pride of aristocracy.

We derive the renewal of our blood and juices, which are constantly exhausting, from the substances converted into food.

They seem also to derive a sacredness from their association with the Divine Being.

All abstractions are supposed by Hegel to derive their meaning from one another.

Did Plato derive the legend of Atlantis from an Egyptian source?

And what a power in Italy should not Lodovico derive from its success!

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DERIVE

descend

verbtrace ancestry from; be passed or handed down

descended

verbtrace ancestry from; be passed or handed down
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.