Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DE PART

Well, de part goes, he comes over dere but didn't do lak they does now, bust right in and 'clare his 'fections to de gal.

Brunnow received his answer yesterday, with many civilities and regrets, de part et d'autre.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-13c., "part from each other," from Old French departir (10c.) "to divide, distribute; separate (oneself), depart; die," from Late Latin departire "divide" (transitive), from de- "from" (see de-) + partire "to part, divide," from pars (genitive partis) "a part" (see part (n.)).

As a euphemism for "to die" (to depart this life; cf. Old French departir de cest siecle) it is attested from c.1500, as is the departed for "the dead," singly or collectively. Transitive lingers in some English usages; the wedding service was till death us depart until 1662. Related: Departed; departing.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.