Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CUT-THROAT

Faithful to their cut-throat trade, I made no doubt he meant.

The town looks on him as a cut-throat who has narrowly escaped the gallows.

Mr. Zachary Smith resisted the blandishments of “cut-throat” euchre.

I've thought of nothing but you since the day I saw you with that cut-throat.

"I believe you," he muttered, looking steadily at the cut-throat.

"That's all right—but you pay my money first," the cut-throat insisted.

On the other hand, the cut-throat trout were excellent eating.

The hero of the Palolithic age is the brigand and cut-throat of to-day.

One was Heraud, the other Jame, a cut-throat dog of no value.

"To look at him you might think that he's a cut-throat," said Kerbakh.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English þrote (implied in þrotbolla "the Adam's apple, larynx," literally "throat boll"), related to þrutian "to swell," from Proto-Germanic *thrut- (cf. Old High German drozza, German Drossel, Old Saxon strota, Middle Dutch strote, Dutch strot "throat"), perhaps from PIE *trud- (cf. Old English þrutian "to swell," Old Norse þrutna "to swell").

The notion is of "the swollen part" of the neck. Italian strozza "throat," strozzare "to strangle" are Germanic loan-words. College slang for "competitive student" is 1970s, from cutthroat.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CUT-THROAT

killer

nounmurderer
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.