curdle

[ kur-dl ]SEE DEFINITION OF curdle

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CURDLE

Do not let it actually boil, as that will cause the blood to curdle.

Set it on a gentle fire, and stir it that it may not curdle.

Stir again over the fire to cook the eggs, but take care they do not curdle.

Cream is liable to curdle, and turn to butter, if beaten in too warm a temperature.

Then add the yolks of the eggs; let them thicken in the sauce, but be careful not to curdle them.

Stir until the mixture thickens, being careful it does not curdle.

Put it into a teapot and pour it into the juice, holding the teapot up very high, that it may froth and curdle the better.

With too little water the sugar will curdle before it has boiled enough.

Care must be taken to remove the pie as soon as done, otherwise it will curdle.

Stir this until it is smoking hot, but be careful not to boil, or it will curdle.

WORD ORIGIN

1630s (earlier crudle, 1580s), "to thicken, cause to congeal," frequentative of curd (v.) "to make into curd" (late 14c.; see curd). Of blood, in figurative sense "to inspire horror" from c.1600. Related: Curdled (1590); curdling (c.1700, almost always with reference to blood, in the figurative sense).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CURDLE

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