confederate

[ adjective, noun kuhn-fed-er-it, -fed-rit; verb kuhn-fed-uh-reyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF confederate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONFEDERATE

I shall take other measures; for I see you are a confederate with them.

No, he's Federal, Confederate or guerilla as it may suit his bloody ends.

We never charge a Confederate soldier for anything; that's not our way.

At any rate I was convinced she was a good Confederate, and my heart rose.

They spotted him and a confederate slipped a hypo into his arm.

If so, he would, through the Ford girl, in all probability be able to trace her confederate.

Every confederate who was across was either killed or captured.

When the performer lifts his head he ceases counting, so does the confederate.

His secretary, as he called him, was merely his confederate.

But he did not speak, and the Confederate agent never took his eyes off him.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Late Latin confoederatus "leagued together," past participle of confoederare "to unite by a league," from com- "with, together" (see com-) + foederare, from foedus (genitive foederis) "a league" (see federal). Also used as a past participle adjective from late 14c., as a simple adjective from 1550s; meaning "of or belonging to the Confederate States of America" is from 1861. Used as a noun from late 15c. (Late Latin confoederatus also was used as a noun in its day).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONFEDERATE

abettor

nounassistant
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.