circus

[ sur-kuh s ]SEE DEFINITION OF circus

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CIRCUS

The meeting was held in the vast auditorium of the Circus Building, which was filled.

If Monsieur the Director of the Circus comes now he will go in the special car.

The first man to approach the wicket was the Director of the Circus.

It was a circus really, but that the worshippers did not know.

If you stop her off there, I dunno but she'd jine a circus or take to drink!

It would not have a circus of its own, forsooth, but it would share in ours!

And still the circus advanced, and the horse snorted and backed.

The circus had been the sole topic of conversation for a fortnight.

Why, they'll come as far to see your house as they will to the circus!

The other boys stood there watching the "circus," as Tubby called it.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., in reference to ancient Rome, from Latin circus "ring, circular line," which was applied by Romans to circular arenas for performances and contests and oval courses for racing (especially the Circus Maximus), from or cognate with Greek kirkos "a circle, a ring," from PIE *kirk- from root *(s)ker- "to turn, bend" (see ring (n.)).

In reference to modern large arenas for performances from 1791; sense then extended to the performing company, hence "traveling show" (originally traveling circus, 1838). Extended in World War I to squadrons of military aircraft. Meaning "lively uproar, chaotic hubbub" is from 1869. Sense in Picadilly Circus and other place names is from early 18c. sense "buildings arranged in a ring," also "circular road." The adjective form is circensian.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CIRCUS

gymnasium

nounarena for sports, recreation

zoo

nouncrowded, wild, and chaotic place
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.