Synonyms for choked up

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CHOKED UP

Mother Coupeau was not hungry, being too choked up to be able to eat.

Because the place would get choked up with artists I suppose.

It was only at the brow of the ridge, where the undergrowth had choked up the way.

You have neither had time nor occasion to get it so choked up as doubtless his must be.

Or, if ice came with the wind, the lanes might be choked up.

Say, choked up Markham—but Frank strode away, whistling to himself.

Connecting with the street was a narrow alley, now choked up with snow.

When we tried to speak to her we just choked up and stood still.

A trusted woman like you must be choked up with secrets, I'm sure.

He choked up something about mistakes, and zeal, and forgiveness.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, transitive, "to strangle;" late 14c., "to make to suffocate," of persons as well as swallowed objects, a shortening of acheken (c.1200), from Old English aceocian "to choke, suffocate" (with intensive a-), probably from root of ceoke "jaw, cheek" (see cheek (n.)).

Intransitive sense from c.1400. Meaning "gasp for breath" is from early 15c. Figurative use from c.1400, in early use often with reference to weeds stifling the growth of useful plants (a Biblical image). Meaning "to fail in the clutch" is attested by 1976, American English. Related: Choked; choking. Choke-cherry (1785) supposedly so called for its astringent qualities. Johnson also has choke-pear "Any aspersion or sarcasm, by which another person is put to silence." Choked up "overcome with emotion and unable to speak" is attested by 1896. The baseball batting sense is by 1907.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CHOKED UP

tongue-tied

adjectiveunable to speak
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.