Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CAST LOOSE

Cast loose the stern-chaser and fire her at yon varlet if he makes a move.

The Carondelet cast loose and steamed slowly down the river.

He cast loose the painter of the launch, and with all his strength shoved it clear.

There was not time to raise steam—only to cast loose the guns for action.

There was nothing for it but to cast loose and run before the wind.

We ran into the water, and cast loose the body; but our undertaking had been useless.

Saunders, slip out and cast loose the fore topmast staysail.

It was splendid work; and from the first order, ‘Cast loose!’

When this is done, the carcase is cast loose, and the head is emptied, and let go also.

“Cast loose that shovel from under the thwart, Brace, my lad,” he said.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., "not securely fixed;" c.1300, "unbound," from Old Norse lauss "loose, free, vacant, dissolute," cognate with Old English leas "devoid of, false, feigned, incorrect," from Proto-Germanic *lausaz (cf. Danish løs "loose, untied," Swedish lös "loose, movable, detached," Middle Dutch, German los "loose, free," Gothic laus "empty, vain"), from PIE *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart" (see lose). Meaning "not clinging, slack" is mid-15c. Meaning "not bundled" is late 15c. Sense of "unchaste, immoral" is recorded from late 15c. Meaning "at liberty, free from obligation" is 1550s. Sense of "rambling, disconnected" is from 1680s. Figurative sense of loose cannon was in use by 1896, probably from celebrated image in a popular story by Hugo:

Loose end in reference to something unfinished, undecided, unguarded is from 1540s; to be at loose ends is from 1807. Phrase on the loose "free, unrestrained" is from 1749 (upon the loose).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CAST LOOSE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.