bucolics

[ byoo-kol-iks ]SEE DEFINITION OF bucolics
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BUCOLICS

I noticed more than fifty expressions which could be found in the 'Bucolics.'

Vergil's first work was the Bucolics, in imitation of Theocritus.

I muttered, "it is your satires, not the bucolics of Virgil, that suit this epoch!"

Pasiphaë's monstrous passion for a bull is certainly a subject enough fitted for bucolics.

They also keep capons, fruit, and other things, and for all these matters there is a book which they call the Bucolics.

The publication of the Bucolics was attended by such great success that they were frequently recited, even by actors on the stage.

Eclogue, ek′log, n. a short pastoral poem like Virgil's Bucolics.

They also keep capons, fruit and other things, and for all these matters there is a book which they call the Bucolics.

His compositions in Latin are—Africa, an epic poem; his Bucolics, containing twelve eclogues; and three books of epistles.

The Eclogues, sometimes called also Bucolica or Bucolics, are ten short pastoral poems.