synonyms
  • definitions

brights

[ brahyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF brights
  • as insunrise
  • as inmorn
  • as insunup
  • as indawn
  • as inday
  • as indaybreak

Synonyms for brights

  • aurora
  • cockcrow
  • dawn
  • dawning
  • daybreak
  • daylight
  • light
  • morn
  • morning
  • sunup
  • break of day
  • bright
  • early bright
MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for brights

  • darkness
  • evening
  • eventide
  • night
  • sundown
  • sunset
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BRIGHTS

He dare not touch a drop because he has Brights disease in the last stages.

Professor Christison also claims that three-fourths, or even four-fifths, of Brights disease in Scotland is produced by alcohol.

These changes were so marked as to justify a diagnosis of incipient nephritis, or Brights disease.

They lasted in Mr. Brights case till his death, and there was between him and Mr. Field something which might be called affection.

On leaving the Brights' dinner-party, Captain Dalton made his way to his car and sped out upon the moonlit road.

He had left the Brights' party fully intending to run out to Sombari, but had been diverted; and now it was too late.

At the Brights', only Honor was at home, her mother having driven to the bazaar for muslin to make new curtains.

She had been called away from her "brights," and there was a mournful relish of Jackie's plight on her face.

So the dinner-party at the Brights' was a settled engagement and Joyce prepared to keep it.

She decided that the Brights would have to do without her, and forgive the disappointment.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English bryht, by metathesis from beorht "bright; splendid; clear-sounding; beautiful; divine," from Proto-Germanic *berhta- "bright" (cf. Old Saxon berht, Old Norse bjartr, Old High German beraht, Gothic bairhts "bright"), from PIE root *bhereg- "to gleam, white" (cf. Sanskrit bhrajate "shines, glitters," Lithuanian breksta "to dawn," Welsh berth "bright, beautiful"). Meaning "quick-witted" is from 1741.