boggle

[ bog-uh l ]SEE DEFINITION OF boggle

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BOGGLE

For—not to boggle about it—I am in some uneasiness, Miss Smith.

But Doggie was not one to boggle at the truth, as he saw it.

They may boggle at a word or a phrase in terminology which is avowedly idiomatic.

You might take a needle and boggle up your rags, as decency demands.

I did not boggle at his slave-dealing, but took him on the spot.

She wasn't made for work—any one could see that—and it was a cruel shame to let her boggle on with it.

“Boggle” is a Norse word, sometimes equal to personification of diety or saint.

A nation converted to the gospel of Eugenics will not boggle at providing the means for saving itself.

I thought Pheola might boggle about going into my apartment, but she came readily enough.

They were therefore such as, in all probability, would not boggle at very free sentiments.

WORD ORIGIN

1590s, "to start with fright" (as a startled horse does), from Middle English bugge "specter" (among other things, supposed to scare horses at night); see bug (n.); also cf. bogey (n.1). The meaning "to raise scruples, hesitate" is from 1630s. Related: Boggled; boggling.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BOGGLE

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