ambidextrous

[ am-bi-dek-struh s ]SEE DEFINITION OF ambidextrous
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR AMBIDEXTROUS

It is thus by attempting to be ambidextrous, I try to ward off attacks.

I should say he was ambidextrous, but he uses his left hand by preference.

A genius, and ambidextrous, he could write sonnets with one hand and compose operas with the other.

Inquiry should be made as to whether the patient is right or left handed, or ambidextrous.

For by nature the right hand is the stronger: but nevertheless it may happen that there are ambidextrous men.

A man who is ambidextrous will sign his name differently with his right or left hand, but it is the same signature.

I am sorry to see that Erasmus imitated his enemies and at times was ambidextrous in the use of the literary stinkpot.

He is painting at a small easel and working in quite a wonderful manner, for he is ambidextrous.

Fortunately he was ambidextrous, could use his left hand almost as readily as his right, and this helped him immensely.

It is rare that you meet a person who is ambidextrous,—that is, who uses both hands equally well.

WORD ORIGIN

1640s, with -ous, from ambidexter (adj.) "double-dealing" (1610s), from French ambidextre or directly from Latin ambidexter, literally "right-handed on both sides," from ambi- "both" (see ambi-) + dexter "right-handed" (see dexterity). Its opposite, ambilevous "left-handed on both sides, clumsy" (1640s) is rare. Ambidexter as a noun, "one who takes bribes from both sides," is attested from 1530s and is the earliest form of the word in English; its sense of "one who uses both hands equally well" appears by 1590s.

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.