aluminum

[ uh-loo-muh-nuh m ]SEE DEFINITION OF aluminum
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ALUMINUM

These alloys are made of a combination of aluminum and magnesium.

It was an eight-foot section of aluminum from the cargo racks.

Only two materials are used in the construction of this hull, aluminum and mahogany.

Aluminum is not advisable for fittings when the boat is to be sailed in salt water.

And it is an aluminum alloy that is not nearly as heavy as it looks.

The toughness of aluminum can be increased by adding a small per cent.

But, after all, it was the banana oil the aluminum paint was mixed with that turned the trick.

They all put on suits of aluminum mail and armed themselves.

It was enough, with some aluminum above the amount needed for the wire.

It was the year one hundred and fifty-two when they smelted the aluminum.

WORD ORIGIN

1812, coined by English chemist Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829), from alumina, name given 18c. to aluminum oxide, from Latin alumen "alum" (see alum). Davy originally called it alumium (1808), then amended this to aluminum, which remains the U.S. word, but British editors in 1812 further amended it to aluminium, the modern preferred British form, to better harmonize with other metallic element names (sodium, potassium, etc.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ALUMINUM

can

nouncontainer, usually metallic
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.