agglomerated

[ verb uh-glom-uh-reyt; adjective, noun uh-glom-er-it, -uh-reyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF agglomerated
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR AGGLOMERATED

It is they who have agglomerated the chaos that is in this hour threshing about in dust and blood.

At sixteen I was secretary to the agglomerated association for vindicating the rights of man.

With them, union was not strength, but weakness: the more they were agglomerated the less were they to be feared.

Here, too, we find different degrees of solidity or density in the agglomerated matter.

They detach with a hook the agglomerated masses of young mussels, which they gather in baskets, and carry them to their bouchots.

The refining is thus completely finished, and all the particles are agglomerated.

The spores in Sporidesmium appear to consist of irregular masses of cells, agglomerated into a kind of compound spore.

In places the point of a needle could scarcely be thrust between the capsules, so closely were they agglomerated.

The best lignite is that which, after combustion, leaves a fine ash and no agglomerated clinker.

The agglomerated product must be porous so as to afford access of the furnace-reducing gases to the ore.

WORD ORIGIN

1680s, from Latin agglomeratus, past participle of agglomerare "to wind or add onto a ball," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + glomerare "wind up in a ball," from glomus (genitive glomeris) "ball of yarn," from PIE root *glem-. Related: Agglomerated; agglomerating.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.