affectation

[ af-ek-tey-shuhn ]SEE DEFINITION OF affectation

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR AFFECTATION

But this is abnormal and rather an affectation of technical skill.

There was no affectation of the fine lady in her self-reproach.

There was no affectation of mystery, no attempt at keeping his experiments a secret.

The only source of the true Ridiculous (as it appears to me) is affectation.

Their affectation is beyond the affectation of woman, and it makes all men sick.

Whether this was from habit or affectation it was not easy to decide.

Do not however think me guilty of an affectation in what I have said of my brother and sister.

Had he said me at first, I should have been above the affectation of mentioning a lawyer.

Besides, he also was beginning to feel ill at ease and vexed at their affectation of silence.

I suspect you are in love, in spite of your affectation of being blase.

WORD ORIGIN

"studied display," 1540s, from French affectation (16c.) or directly from Latin affectationem (nominative affectatio) "a striving after, a claiming," noun of action from past participle stem of affectare "to strive for" (see affect (v.2)).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR AFFECTATION

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