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abound

[ uh-bound ]SEE DEFINITION OF abound

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ABOUND

They abound upon the shores of the sea and of lakes, but are rarely seen in rivers.

Neither in truth do they abound in iron, as from the fashion of their weapons may be gathered.

There are also several large lakes, which abound with white trout.

Mineral waters, hot and cold, abound on the table-land of Mexico.

The roads, however, abound in mud, and the streams are enormously swollen.

They abound in Egypt, and were a common decoration of its immense temples.

Allusions to events of the day which abound in the poem enable us to date it.

Of course, they abound with eccentric abnormities and startling phenomena.

They are never found north of that stream, although they abound below it.

They abound, however, with true instincts, which are the most wonderful that are known.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., from Old French abonder "to abound, be abundant, come together in great numbers" (12c.), from Latin abundare "overflow, run over," from Latin ab- "off" (see ab-) + undare "rise in a wave," from unda "water, wave" (see water (n.)). Related: Abounded; abounding.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ABOUND

swarming

verbmove forward as a group
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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